Tag: fiction friday

Fiction Friday: Book Review- Run by Kody Keplinger

RunRun by Kody Keplinger
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Bo and Agnes should not be friends. Bo is the town’s typical bad girl while Agnes is considered a sweet angel by the town. They’re total opposites. Or are they?
When Bo and Agnes meet, they become fast friends. One day, things get too bad for Bo at home and she decides to run away. Agnes joins her. Their journey away from their small town and the events leading up to it form part of this story.
I thought this was an interesting story but it felt a bit lacking. There were several questions I had that were left unanswered at the end of the book. This was a quick read but I enjoyed it and I could not put it down. I loved how different Bo and Agnes were from each other. It was refreshing to see such a deep bond between females.
The characters in this book were all amazingly well-written and well-developed. I just wish that the ending was more complete. Reading this book was incredible but the ending left me feeling a bit empty.

View all my reviews

Fiction Friday: Book Review- Born of Defiance (The League #7) by Sherri Lynn Kenyon

Born of Defiance (The League, #7)Born of Defiance by Sherrilyn Kenyon
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I really enjoyed this book even though I barely understood it. Talyn is a fighter and an Andarion with no father. As a result of the latter, he faces discrimination on a daily basis. He is treated as less than a person. When Talyn decides to get himself a companion, his entire life changes and he decides he deserves to have something more. I have no idea what an Andarion is (and the book doesn’t explain what it is) but I enjoyed the book nonetheless. I also didn’t understand Andarion culture and tradition but the book explained those. This was a really intriguing book. The plot was suspenseful and the characters well-written and well-developed. I’m definitely going to be following this series. Whatever the Andarions are, they have a rich history and I can’t wait to learn more about them. I strongly recommend this series to all fans of fantasy.

View all my reviews

Fiction Friday: Jonathan Ball Publishers Book Haul

A few days ago (I cannot tell you exactly when because my memory is really crappy), I had a really difficult day. I was exhausted and my head hurt like hell (thinking of someone playing the drums on your head? Yeah that’s what it felt like). So you can imagine how excited I was to come home to a book delivery from Jonathan Ball Publishers. And then I opened the package and omg it was everything I didn’t know I wanted.

 

IMG_20170227_173900_583

These books all look perfect for my reading tastes and I cannot wait to start reading them.

 

Fiction Friday: Book Review- My Name is Simon (A Rainfall Short Story) by Melissa Delport 

My Name is Simon: A Rainfall Short StoryMy Name is Simon: A Rainfall Short Story by Melissa Delport

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I was so eager to read this book that I bought it as soon as I saw it without even bothering to look at the price.
I am a huge fan of Melissa Delport’s writing but “Rainfall” had me sobbing like a baby so I never reviewed it.
Reading “My Name is Simon” however is such a comfort after “Rainfall”.
This isn’t a full novel but Simon’s character and his motivations are shown so well. As much as I hated him it was impossible not to feel for this guy who has had most of his life ripped from him.
I desperately wanted to hate this book (to match my initial hatred of Simon) but I couldn’t.
“My Name is Simon” is incredibly well-written and the book finishes beautifully.

View all my reviews

Fiction Friday: Interview With Leslie Welch

Leslie Welch is the author behind “The Goodbyes”, a novel that is equally heartwarming and heart-wrenching. I caught up with her to find out more about the beautifully moving book.

image

1) Tell us a bit more about yourself

I’m the person at the grocery store who holds up the checkout line because the cashier is telling me her life story. I’m only half-joking. I’m a listener, a connector, and an intense observer of life. But I’m also a textbook Leo: a little wild, dramatic, and a natural leader. It’s probably a strange combination for an author, but it works for me. I love being on the water–especially in a sailboat. I’m a huge foodie. And I’ll drink coffee until my jaw clenches from caffeine intoxication. 

2) How did you come up with the idea for “The Goodbyes”?

I was driving to my childhood home in Pittsburgh. If you don’t live where you grew up, going home can be a surreal experience, at least it is for me. A lot of people that I grew up with still live in the area. Anytime I go back, I end up seeing someone from high school. Sometimes it’s amazing, and other times? Not so much. 

It’s a four hour drive from D.C. to my mom’s house. After the first two hours of the drive, I started to get lonely and bored, so I decided to do some creative exercises. I started daydreaming that I was a rock star going home. I made the fantasy a little more interesting. I was going home to see the guy who inspired all my songs. And then, I brought in the big conflict–he was dying. I couldn’t wait to start writing! I decided to write the story from a male perspective to challenge myself.

3) What sort of research did you do while writing “The Goodbyes”?

Some of the situations in the book are inspired by real-life events. Before I wanted to be a writer, I wanted to be a musician. I even dropped out of college for a semester to focus on music. 

I’m lucky to know people who do really cool things. I interviewed my friends who have toured with their bands. I went backstage at big shows. I sat in on recording sessions.

I also did a lot of research on celebrated musicians; I watched interviews and read memoirs. And, although I’ve been to Glen Hope and the surrounding coal towns, I spent a lot of time on Google Maps “driving” my little yellow Google guy around.

4) What was the best part of writing “The Goodbyes”? Was there a specific scene or an aspect of writing the book that was particularly memorable?

I loved writing the ending. The original ending was good, but, as Charlotte would say, it didn’t “make my scalp shiver.” The night before I was supposed to turn the manuscript over to my editor, I had a last-minute bolt of inspiration. I stayed up all night rewriting the ending. It’s my favorite part of the book now. I can’t imagine Webb’s story ending any other way.

5) Is there anything about the writing life that you think is misunderstood by the public?

I used to imagine that when writers typed “the end” they were done. In reality, that’s only the beginning. Pristine prose doesn’t flow out of our fingers on the first try. It takes a lot of work to get it right after the first draft. 

Writing is a partnership between creators and editors. Most writers are not masters of the English language. We struggle with punctuation (seriously, let’s not talk about my comma issues). We get to take credit in the byline, but we don’t create the magic alone.

6) What sort of books do you usually read?

Right now, collections of short stories are filling up my Kindle. I try to read a lot of different genres. For a while, I was obsessed with biographies about actresses from the golden age of Hollywood. I love Young Adult novels. There’s something comforting about tapping into a time of life that seems full of possibilities–where you’re not assaulted by the mundane details of adulthood like interviewing contractors to replace your roof. 

7) Do you have any advice to give to aspiring writers?

I can’t take credit for this wisdom, but here’s some of the best advice I’ve collected over the years:

• Don’t edit until the first draft is done. Make notes if you must. The first draft is supposed to be a disaster. If you get bogged down chasing perfection, you won’t finish. Embrace the mess–fix it later.

• If you’re writing for insta-fame, you’re doing it wrong. 

• Write something you want to read. If you think it’s too weird for the world, you’re doing it right.

• Connect with other writers. Follow them on Twitter. Build your community; you’ll need them. 

• Eliminate passive voice with a vengeance. Search your document for the verb “to be” in all forms. Analyze each sentence and rewrite as many as you can.

• Read your dialogue out loud. 

• Reject the rejection, but consider the criticism. If someone’s telling you there are issues with your story, take a step back and try to see it from their perspective. 

• Throw in a 180 degree twist if you don’t know where else to go.

8) The characters in “The Goodbyes” are very real and flawed. Personally I’d love to see more of them. Do you have any plans for a sequel?

(*blushes) I’ve been thinking about writing Charlotte’s story. She’s my favorite character in this book and was so much fun to write. One piece of trivia: TempFive makes a cameo in my next book. 

9) What can we expect from you in the future?

I have four books in different stages of chaos. Currently, I’m rewriting my first novel–a YA Urban Fantasy that I wrote with my best friend. The working title is Tandem. 

It’s the story of a rebellious auto heiress who discovers she’s half extra-dimensional. When she starts her junior year of high school, her family declares bankruptcy and the guy she loves becomes a monk—literally. On top of that, she has to worry about trying not to blow things up with her emerging powers and it’s really getting in the way of her social life. We’re aiming for a late 2017 release. 

As soon as the final draft of Tandem is in the hands of our editor, I’ll tackle another Women’s Fiction project that I started a few months ago about a Congressional staffer who quits her job and leaves her boyfriend of four years (because he can’t commit). I’m really excited to see where her story goes.

You can order a pre-order copy of “The Goodbyes” from Amazon or Barnes and Noble

Fiction Friday: Book Review- Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

Me Before You (Me Before You, #1)Me Before You by Jojo Moyes
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I read this book yesterday and I feel as if I’ve lost someone after reading it. This is such an emotional book. I cried in the beginning, I cried in the end- I didn’t cry in the middle because it wasn’t sad but it was such a gripping story. I was drawn from the very start of the book.Will has been in an accident that left him in a wheelchair, depending on everyone else around him for survival. Lou is his new (and very inept) carer. They are as different as can be but eventually they fall in love. This book has a heartbreaking ending but it’s so good. This is a beautiful read but be warned, you WILL be left in tears.

Fiction Friday: Book Review- The Cathedral of Cliffdale ( Guardians of Summerfield #1 ) by Melissa Delport

The Cathedral of Cliffdale (Guardians of Summerfeld, #1)The Cathedral of Cliffdale by Melissa Delport
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I really enjoyed this book. At first it was confusing since there’s so many characters and so many supernatural creatures. Once I really got into the book though it was great. There’s several group of people- the guardians, the Vampires, the gypsies and the humans- but they’re all after one thing. Summerfield.
Quinn has abandoned her duty as a Guardian to take care of her niece and nephew. However her father and fellow Guardians demand that she returns to Summerfield. To ensure her co-operation they take the children. Quinn is left to either return to her job as a Guardian (and risk having her niece and nephew live a life without her) or to find something more precious that will help free the kids.
The world-building here is excellent. Summerfield has a rich history with lots of stories and myths behind it. I especially enjoyed how there were so many creatures in Summerfield including dragons and faeries. I can’t wait to read more.
Fans of fantasy will devour this book!

View all my reviews

Follow

Get the latest posts delivered to your mailbox: